Depressed moods, persistent feelings of irritability or hopelessness, and difficulty to function daily functions are symptoms of clinical depression. Those who endure these feelings may often attempt to ease their symptoms with prescribed antidepressant medication.

Clinical Depression

Although medications can be effective for some people, they are not for everyone, especially when side effects interfere with your life. For more information about clinical depression, you should speak to your doctor or qualified health professional.

The majority of individuals with depression do not receive a clinical diagnosis until they have received a second or third diagnosis. In almost every case, these diagnoses are made on the basis of the patient’s behavior.

If a person has been experiencing depression for nearly every day for a two-week period, that person probably is suffering from moderate to severe depression. In order to confirm a diagnosis, more testing will probably be required.

Mild depression is usually diagnosed when the patient shows signs of excessive sadness for at least six months

This level of sadness is not disabling or painful but does not interfere with one’s functioning in most daily activities. Mild depression is usually characterized by

  • Feelings of guilt
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Decreased appetite or overeating
  • Headaches
  • Social withdrawal
  • Feelings of worthlessness
Read also:   Changes in Lifestyle Can Reduce Infertility

Mild depression is usually not disabling, but it can lead to significant changes in functioning if untreated. Individuals with this level of depression are usually referred to a psychotherapist, and if the diagnosis is minor (not meeting criteria for either major depression or dysthymia), the patient may be referred to a psychiatrist specializing in depression.

Because persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia) requires ongoing treatment, it is less common than major depression. Those who suffer from severe depression symptoms need to see their physicians more often.

Symptoms of severe depression include

  • Persistent feelings of sadness or lack of happiness
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Thoughts of death or suicide
  • Hopelessness
  • Constant thoughts that things will never get better

In patients who meet the criteria for both dysthymia and major depression, the physician-diagnosed symptoms are usually mild enough to be treated with antidepressant medications.

If these medications are unable to produce adequate results, additional psychological counseling is necessary to treat severe cases of clinical depression.

Dysthymia, which is a manic depressive illness, usually develops in early adolescence or early adulthood, although it can occur later in life

Dysthymia usually affects individuals who have experienced significant changes in their life, including a recent loss of a loved one, a divorce, a pregnancy, or any other traumatic event.

Most individuals with dysthymia experience only short periods of sadness, or low levels of sadness, but they may develop situational depression, a condition that occurs when they experience sadness that is out of proportion to the situation that causes the sadness.

Situational depression can interfere with the patient’s ability to function normally in everyday situations. It can cause symptoms to worsen if the patient is stressed, frustrated, anxious, or depressed.

Read also:   Understanding and Coping With a Miscarriage

The second most common condition is major depressive disorder (MDD)

This condition is a disease that impacts the majority of the population. This symptom may also be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on how severe the symptoms are.

Most people with MDD experience a significantly lower quality of life than those without MDD. People with MDD usually have symptoms that occur throughout the week, instead of just at particular times, like those with dysthymia.

Some of the symptoms of MDD are insomnia, increased sadness and anxiety, inability to concentrate, persistent negative moods, fatigue, difficulty remembering things, and physical pain.

In addition to dysthymia and MDD, there are several other conditions that can coexist with the symptoms of clinical depression

For instance, a condition that many people will call situational depression can be a precursor to suicidal thoughts or attempts. This condition is characterized by constant and intense emotional concerns about money, health, or physical health.

However, the condition can be so mild that it will only lead to minor depressive episodes. If it is severe enough, it could develop into a more serious form of clinical depression, which can be fatal if not treated.

If you believe that you, a friend, or a loved one may be experiencing suicidal thoughts or attempts, please get help immediately. Some people may think that they do not need to seek treatment for clinical depression because they feel that they can handle the symptoms themselves.

This is a problematic idea, as there are many reasons why some individuals cannot handle a certain facet of their lives, whether it be good or bad. The symptoms of dysthymia or MDD can be intense enough to interfere with day to day activities, causing a person to lose work and cause a person to feel overwhelmed.

Read also:   Boosting Male Fertility Naturally with a Healthy Lifestyle

Likewise, if the condition is severe enough, it may prevent people from being able to leave a dangerous situation. Being aware of the symptoms of clinical depression in adults is a critical aspect of helping these individuals find the help they need.

 775 total views,  1 views today

A part-time blogger who blog about Business, Information Technology, Digital Marketing, Real Estate, Digital Currencies, Health and Beauty, and Educational topics that can be of value to people who visit my website
Spread the love
  • 8
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    9
    Shares
  •  
    9
    Shares
  • 8
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •